Paul McCartney Has A ‘Shocking’ Return To Hometown

Sir Paul McCartney has branded a recent tour of his childhood home “shocking” after returning to the property in Liverpool, England for the first time more than in 30 years.

The Beatles legend was joined by comedian James Corden for the visit last week, ends June 15, which was filmed for broadcast on America’s The Late Late Show with James Corden, but instead of simply pulling up outside the preserved pad and admiring the building from afar, the TV host urged McCartney to show him inside.

The rocker, who had teamed up with Corden to record a version of his popular Carpool Karaoke segment, hadn’t stepped foot in his old house for three decades, and it proved to be a really emotional experience for him.

“Doing the Carpool Karaoke was a lot of fun, but the highlight was something I’ve not been wanting to do really, which was revisit my old house, which they’ve made into a National Trust house,” McCartney told BBC Radio 2.

“I’d always heard about it and what I would do normally when I’m up in Liverpool, I’ll just drive up and pull up outside it and then say to whoever I’m with in the car, ‘OK, that was my old room there, this is where we used to live,’ and I’ll tell them a few stories and I’d drive off – I’d never go in. But James wanted to go in, so for the first time since I lived there, we went in and wow – it was kind of shocking.”

As McCartney, 76, walked through the familiar surroundings, he realised how small and “old-fashioned” the home was.

“It’s the same as everyone experiences when you go back (to a childhood home) – it was little,” he explained. “You know, it looked so much smaller because I was little. Although, I mean I was still living there when The Beatles were going on so I was early 20s – so I wasn’t that little – but it just looked very small and as we say in Liverpool ‘dead antwacky (really old-fashioned)’.

“I’m thinking, ‘Wait a minute, when I lived there it didn’t seem old-fashioned at all,’ because it’s just your house and you don’t gauge it against anything and, of course, that was the period when everyone’s houses looked a bit like that, but it looked to me like, whoa, my God, like ancient history. But it was great. It was really exciting to go round – ‘Oh, that was the cupboard where I kept the condensed milk in. Oh and there’s where my dad washed the dishes,’ and all this. It sparked off a lot of nice memories for me.”

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